The majority of RVs are equipped with TVs.

However, finding out the best method to watch your favorite programs while traveling might be difficult.

So, let’s see which is best for RVs: Dish vs. DIRECTV.

DIRECTV is better for full-time RVers in general.

DIRECTV offers a greater number of HD channels and sports bundles than Dish.

DIRECTV, on the other hand, demands a two-year commitment, while Dish provides a more flexible bundle with no contractual obligations.

DirecTV also provides nationwide feeds from off-air broadcasting networks on the West and East coasts.

But there’s a lot more to learn.

In this post, we’ll look at how to watch TV in an RV and how much a satellite dish costs.

However, we’ll look at how to watch DIRECTV in an RV as well.

Let’s get this party started.

In An RV, What’s The Best Method To Watch TV?

The ideal method to watch TV in an RV is with a Roku ultra linked to a USB hard drive.

For internet while traveling, the Roku may be linked to a phone or connected to a campground’s Wi-Fi.

When there is no internet connection, the hard drive may be used to store shows and movies.

That’s the identical combination I use in my RV (and at my house).

Netflix and Prime allow me to download select episodes and movies.

If you still have DVDs, you may burn them and save them on the hard drive as well.

If you don’t have internet, it’s the ideal option to view movies while driving or boondocking.

A satellite, on the other hand, would come in second.

You’ll need to decide whether you want a portable or a fixed antenna to access satellite TV in your RV.

A mounted antenna is appropriate if you want to RV full-time.

If you aren’t, though, a portable version is the way to go.

But what if you already have satellite TV in your house? Is it possible for you to continue utilizing the service in your RV? The answer is, unfortunately, no.

You may add a satellite TV subscription to your RV, but the one for your house is different.

Your house isn’t portable.

As a result, the one for RVs necessitates a different configuration.

“You won’t be able to utilize your home satellite plan in your RV, but a mobile satellite package may be available.”

While satellite television is a strong technology, I’d be negligent if I didn’t note that if you’re in the woods, the signal may be hindered.

Interference may also be caused by structures such as buildings, walls, and scaffolding.

Rain or strong winds might also interfere with reception.

Streaming, on the other hand, is a terrific alternative if you’re going to be spending a lot of time at a campsite.

Of course, you’ll have to keep an eye on data use prices.

What Does A Satellite Dish For An RV Cost?

The cost of a satellite dish for an RV ranges from $500 to $1800.

Some need to be permanently installed on the RV, while others are movable and may be left outside while parked at campsites.

A few meals are also available for less than $500.

You get what you paid for, like with most things.

Here’s a rundown of some of the greatest models available:

  • Winegard GM-6000 Carryout G2+ Automatic Portable Satellite TV Antenna with Power Inserter
  • KING VQ4500 Tailgater Portable/Roof Mountable Satellite TV Antenna (for use with DISH)
  • Winegard RT2035T RoadTrip T4 In-Motion RV Satellite Dish (DISH, DIRECTV, BellTV) – Fully Automatic RV Satellite Antenna

Are you considering living in an RV full-time?

Before you sell your home and abandon society, have a look at one of my recent articles.

In it, I told it like it was about living full-time in an RV.

You’ll discover the most important advantages and disadvantages.

In My RV, How Can I Watch DIRECTV?

To watch DIRECTV in your RV, you’ll need to first buy a portable satellite dish.

If you currently have a DIRECTV subscription, you may utilize the receiver from your home or rent one from DIRECTV for a nominal monthly cost.

As you travel throughout America, you’ll have access to over 100 DIRECTV channels.

For an extra $15 per month, you may get broadcast networks like ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC via towers in either New York or Los Angeles, depending on your location.

Except for the charge to get Distant Network Service, there are no further fees to pay other obtaining the necessary equipment.

ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC are all available via Distant Network Service, a mobile satellite service.

For a DIRECTV satellite TV subscription, you’ll need to sign a two-year contract.

There is no pay-as-you-go plan.

How Does Dish For RV Work?

In order to watch Dish in an RV, you’ll need a satellite as well as one of Dish’s subscription options.

Dish, on the other hand, provides RVers with a Pay-As-You-Go service that they may activate and cancel as required.

It’s priced in 30-day increments and is excellent for part-time RVers who don’t require service all year.

RVs are well-served by Dish Network.

Antennas and a receiver are required to utilize Dish.

It does, however, provide its own portable satellite antennae.

They’re technologically sophisticated, with HD on all exterior antennas, and they’re made by firms with which it’s associated.

You may also record your favorite television programs.

Antennas may be rather costly.

However, according to its website, the antennas it sells are the cheapest, and they can be put up quickly and easily.

They also sell a DISH satellite receiver and a cellular signal booster that increases the range of cellular signals and speeds up internet transfers.

The subscription plans are reasonably priced.

If you’re currently a client, you can simply add $5 per month to activate the subscription for your RV as of this writing.

However, during the months you’ll be using it, it’ll cost $52.99 a month on a pay-as-you-go basis.

So, how can you obtain Dish service for your RV? On its website, it states:

In 3 Easy Steps, DISH Outdoors

  • Choose a DISH Portable Satellite Antenna + Wally HD Receiver Bundle. Choose from the bundles below and call us at 1-844-327-0829 to purchase your equipment. …
  • Select your TV Package. New to DISH? …
  • Call to Activate. Call 1-844-327-0829 when your equipment arrives to activate your service.

Have you ever wondered whether living in an RV is less expensive than owning a home?

Because this is the subject of a recent piece of mine, I’ve got you covered.

I discussed whether or not living in an RV saves money and how much RV life costs.

But I also explained when selling everything and living in an RV is a good idea.

Is Internet Available For RVs Via Dish Or DIRECTV?

DIRECTV does not provide internet for RVs, however Dish offers it in cooperation with HughesNet.

With a Dish subscription, you’ll need a separate dish for internet, although you may use the same antenna for both.

Despite the fact that both Dish and HughesNet are owned by AT&T, the TV and internet subscriptions are distinct.

You may pay for what you use on a month-by-month basis or when you suspend your service with Dish and HughesNet.

However, you must be a current client to benefit from the cheaper prices.

RVDataSat uses Mobile Satellite Technologies to provide satellite internet to RVs.

It is costly, costing upwards of $400 a month.

The cost of startup gear is similarly high.

It may cost up to $6000.

I just have 30g of mobile data on my phone each month, and when I need internet in my RV and can’t get it anywhere else, I switch on my mobile hotspot.

It works perfectly for my TVs and laptop, and I never over my data limit even after being gone for a month.

What TV Options Do You Have in Your RV? | Directv vs. DISH Satellite TV

RV TELEVISION OPTIONS // Directv OR DISH Satellite TV – Miller’s RV

Conclusion

We looked at the best method to watch TV in an RV and the cost of a satellite dish in this post.

However, we looked into ways to watch DirecTV in an RV as well.

After that, we looked at how Dish works with RVs.

Finally, we investigated if Dish or DirecTV provide internet access for RVs.

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Written by Bob Matsuoka
Bob Matsuoka is a blogger and founder of RVing Beginner blog. He has been blogging for over five years, writing about his own family’s RV adventures, tips for people who are interested in buying an RV or taking their family on an adventure by RV.